The 12 Best Champagne You Should Drink in 2022

Champagne
This is our review of the 12 Best Champagne you should drink this year. Enjoy!

Champagne is the most famous sparkling wine in the world. Apple, lemon, and toast are typical Champagne’s aromas.

The flavors, intensity, and styles vary depending on the producer and his secret blending formula. 

Only the wine produced in the Champagne region in France can be called Champagne. The others, even if produced with the same method, must be called sparkling wine.

Have you ever found yourself staring at many Champagne bottles wondering which one you would like best?
 
After an extensive research, we have picked a selection of the 12 best Champagne you can find right now.
 
As always we try our best to find high quality wine that offers great value for money and I must confess I’m quite happy with the research and work done. 
 
We have categorized them by regions, price point, etc.. and added an extensive buying guide so that you have all you need to make an informed decision.
 
Our best value bottle selection for you is Veuve Clicquot Brut (Carte Jaune) Champagne N.V..
 
If you are after the best overall bottle, our recommendation is Louis Roederer Cristal Brut Champagne (Millésimé) 2013.
 
You’ll find the table of content below. Let’s start with the review!
4.6/5

Vivino’s tips: 98 points by James Suckling (2013 Vintage)

Region: France, Champagne

Tasting notes: Apple, Toasted Hazelnuts, Candid Citrus Fruit, Honeysuckle

This is what Vivino Editor says about this Champagne: “Drink Like Royalty—Your Access to the Most Famous Champagne in the World Is Here.

The Legendary 2013 Cristal Are Up for Grabs from the Champagne House Wine Advocate Hailed as “Impeccable”.”

Expect a precise, pure combination of flowers, finely toasted hazelnuts, and candied citrus fruits.

Silky, concentrated and flavorsome texture with an explosion of ripe fruit, red fruit, white chocolate and caramel.

A powerful and elegant wine with a crescendo of sensations that attains a true harmony of flavors and perfect integration.

4.3/5

Vivino’s tips: Good value for money. Similar wines usually cost 42% more. |
Featured in Best wines between $40 and $80 right now

Region: France, Champagne

Tasting notes: Green Apple, Pear, Citrus Fruit, Brioche, Cream

If you are on a budget, this is the safest bet you should go with, as it offers and incredible value for money.

Very Good. Light gold color; small bubbles. Straw on the nose. Quick tanginess on the tip of the tongue initially, then a slow finish. Lemon acidity.

4.2/5

Vivino’s tips: 5 by The Champagne & Sparkling Wine World Championships

Region: France, Champagne

Tasting notes: Green Apple, Pear, Citrus Fruit, Brioche, Cream

Louis Roederer is another valuable alternative for those of you who are willing to enjoy a great Champagne at an affordable price.

The attack is ample and dense; a rich and winey fullness is refined by the sweetness and acidity. The ensemble is perfectly integrated into a subtle texture.

Tasting reveals sparkling suggestions of candied fruits, almond paste, toast, white chocolate, and caramel.

4.5/5

Vivino’s tips: 97 by Wine Enthusiast (2007 Vintage) | Featured in Vivino’s 2020 Wine Style Awards: French Champagne Vintage (2002 Vintage)

Region: France, Champagne

Tasting notes: Apple, Pears Peaches, Toast, White Flowers

This amazing Blanc de Blancs it is made with 100% white grapes from the 5 villages with a Grands Crus classification for the Chardonnay grape.

Its pure bouquet opens with a contrast between an already well-developed intensity and a finesse that reveals aromas of pears and white flowers.

After a little time, the intensity presents the aromatic richness and maturity of a wine that is already expressing great potential.

4.3/5

Vivino’s tips: Among top 1% of all wines in the world

Region: France, Champagne

Tasting notes: Apple, Apricot, Red Fruit, Brioche, Toast, Mineral.

Pinot Noir is very versatile grape and it can be used to produce outstanding Champagne, like this Blanc de Noirs made entirely with Pinot Noir grapes.

Expect high acidity, fine and persistent bubbles and more fruity notes than the usual Champagne.

In our opinion it is one of the best Blanc de Noirs you can buy at a very reasonable price. If I were, you I’d find a good excuse to celebrate with this one! 😋

4.5/5

Vivino’s tips: Good value for money. Similar wines usually cost 43% more. | 96 by Wine Spectator

Region: France, Champagne

Tasting notes: Apple, Apricot, Hazelnut, Almond, Honey.

This is one of our favorite Brut! Wondering why? Try to find another Brut that matches this quality for the same price…😊

La Grande Année is a refined, elegant wine with pretty, exotic notes of apricots, peaches, honey, flowers, smoke, and toasted oak.

There is a notable clarity and precision, in a style that is generous and approachable.

4.4/5

Vivino’s tips: 93 by Wine Spectator.

Region: France, Champagne

Tasting notes: White Peach, Green Apple, Pear, Citrus Fruit, Brioche, Cream.

The chardonnay is the very soul of Ruinart. The grape, mainly harvested from the Côte des Blancs and Montagne de Reims terroirs, is at the heart of all our cuvées.

Ruinart Blanc de Blancs, intensely aromatic, is the Ruinart Taste emblem. The palate is both precise and clean as the wine delivers a radiant balance between roundness and smoothness.

If you have never tried a Blanc de Blancs start from this one!

4.6/5

Vivino’s tips: 100 by Falstaff Magazine.

Region: France, Champagne

Tasting notes: Green Apple, Pear, Citrus Fruit, Toast, Almond, Honey, Cream, Licorice, Vanilla.

The name is pretty famous and for a reason! If you manage to get hold of the 2008 vintage you’ll have one of top Champagne around at a very competitive price vs its peers.

The immediate impression is of the mildness of the pure, airy, bright bouquet.

A floral, fruity pastel tone then unfolds and quickly darkens into candied fruit, ripe hay and toasted notes, along with hints of licorice.

4.4/5

Vivino’s tips: Good value for money. Similar wines usually cost 37% more.

Region: France, Champagne

Tasting notes: Strawberry, Cherry, Raspberry, Citrus Fruit, Brioche, Cream.

If you like Rosé you must have this one and for the price it’s a real bargain! Its special method of vinification gives this cuvée a light, elegant flavor, followed by a fresh finish with a taste of raspberry.

Its pale and bright pink cooler is adorned with warm glints of gold and its delicate slowly rising bubbles give it a persistent mousse. 

This cuvée unveils a subtle aroma leading to an elegant, delicate bouquet of fine notes of red fruits and zest of citrus fruits. 

4.4/5

Vivino’s tips: Among top 1% of all wines in the world. 

Region: France, Champagne

Tasting notes: Apple, Citrus Fruit, Toast, Almond, Honey, Cream, Straw.

This is one of the best Champagne Vintage you can find under $100. Elegant and complex, you’ll be delighted!
 
Clear, brilliant, gold color lights persistent and remarkable effervescence. Delicate hints of toasted notes lightly candied citrus fruit dried fruits.
4.5/5

Region: France, Champagne

Tasting notes: Apple, Apricot, Citrus Fruit, Brioche, Almond, Honey, Cream, Straw.

If you are short of ideas for a remarkable gift, with this bottle of Champagne you are going to make someone very very happy!

Make sure it is at least for someone generous, as there’s a good chance it will share it with you 😋! 

On the palate, there is plenty of body and substance. The texture is crisp and silky.

The chalky mineral note resonates magnificently with this full-bodied structure and intensifies the lengthy persistence.

The finish is fresh and generous, indicating a light dosage that does nothing to disturb the wine’s natural balance.

4.7/5

Vivino’s tips: Featured in Vivino’s 2019 Wine Style Awards: French Champagne Vintage | Among top 1% of all wines in the world

Region: France, Champagne

Tasting notes: Green Apple, Pear, Citrus Fruit, Tropical Fruit, Toast, Almond, Honey, Cream, Licorice, Vanilla.

It’s not the first “Dom” you find on the list, what’s different from the previous one is that this is 25 years old and counting…

It’s in the luxury session for a reason, even if, compared to some of its peers, it still priced relatively well.

The immediate impression is of the mildness of the pure, airy, bright bouquet.

A floral, fruity pastel tone then unfolds and quickly darkens into candied fruit, ripe hay and toasted notes, along with hints of licorice.

Buying Guide to Champagne

It’s not just about which Champagne you should buy. There are other important aspects like how to serve it, food pairings, and much more.

The below buying guide will give you a detailed overview of all these topics.

Champagne Overview

Here you find an overview of where Champagne is most commonly planted.

The grapes permitted to produce Champagne are Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier [1], Pinot Gris, Pinot Blanc [2], Petit Meslier [3] and Arbane [4].

The first three are used in nearly all Champagne and represent the majority.

Grapes

Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier

ABV

10.5%-12.5%

Main Regions

France: Champagne

Other Regions

Australia
Germany
Italy
New Zealand
Spain
USA: California (Napa Valley, Sonoma)

Grapes

Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier

ABV

10.5%-12.5%

Main Regions

France: Champagne

Other Regions

Australia
Germany
Italy
New Zealand
Spain
USA: California

Champagne Taste Profile

These are some of the most common aromas and flavors of Champagne.

Color

Pale Lemon
Persistent Bubbles

Nose

Apple, Pear
Lemon
Strawberry
Brioche, Toast

Palate

Mineral
Saline
Cream
Brut Nature to Dry
High Acidity
Light Body

Color

Pale Lemon
Persistent Bubbles

Nose

Apple, Pear
Lemon
Strawberry
Brioche, Toast

Palate

Mineral
Saline
Cream
Brut Nature to Dry
High Acidity
Light Body

Champagne Food Pairing

These are some food pairing suggestions for Champagne.

Appetizer

Mac & Cheese,
French Fries,
Creamy Potato Leek Soup,
Salads

Meat

Turkey
Lemon Chicken
Fried Chicken

Fish

Oyster
Lobster
Sashimi
Fish & Chips
Fried calamari

Cheese

Cream Cheese (Camembert)

Appetizer

Mac & Cheese,
French Fries,
Creamy Potato Leek Soup,
Salads

Meat

Turkey
Lemon Chicken
Fried Chicken

Fish

Oyster
Lobster
Sashimi
Fish & Chips
Fried calamari

Cheese

Cream Cheese (Camembert)

Serve and Store Champagne

Here you find some useful tips on how to serve and store Champagne.

Decant

Nope

Glass

Flûte

Serve at

43 - 50 °F
6 - 10 °C

Store for

Up to 4 years for N.V.
Up to 10 years for V.
Finest bottles 10+ years

Decant

Nope

Glass

Flûte

Serve at

43 - 50 °F
6 - 10 °C

Store for

Up to 4 years for N.V.
Up to 10 years for V.
Finest bottles 10+ years

What are the Champagne Styles?

There are primarily 6 Champagne wine styles:

Blanc de Blancs
It’s a white sparkling wine made only with white grapes, and usually Chardonnay

Blanc de Noirs
It’s a white sparkling wine made only with black grapes which are Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier.

Rosé 
As seen in the winemaking guide, Rosé can be made either by maceration, by blending white and red wine, or by adding liqueur d’expédition.

To become sparkling they then follow one of the methods described above.

Prestige Cuvée
When you read Prestige Cuvée you are about to buy the best wine that a given producer can offer.

Non-Vintage
This is usually the standard offering and it means that the wine is made from grapes harvested across various vintages.

Vintage
It means that grapes are all from the same vintage if it’s in Champagne (France), or that most of the grapes are from the same vintage in other areas.

In Champagne, vintage wine is made only on the best years and for this reason, you should expect a higher price for it.

Our Verdict

Champagne is the most famous sparkling wine in the world. Apple, lemon, and toast are typical Champagne’s aromas.

The flavors, intensity, and styles vary depending on the producer and his secret blending formula. 

If you have been through the buying guide, you should have a pretty good idea of how to navigate the Champagne world.
 
At the same time, you have probably realized by now, that there’s a huge selection, many styles, and various price points.
 
The good news is that you can get very high quality usually at a good price if you know where to look!
 
That’s why proper guidance comes in handy. We hope our guide was helpful in this regard.
 
Our best value bottle selection for you is for Veuve Clicquot Brut (Carte Jaune) Champagne N.V..
 
If you are after the best overall bottle, our recommendation is Louis Roederer Cristal Brut Champagne (Millésimé) 2013.
 
As always, make sure to serve your Champagne at the right temperature and with the proper glass.

What to do next?

Be sure to serve your Champagne at the right temperature. Read our wine tasting guide to enhance your tasting experience and taste like the pro!

Alternatively, why don’t you check out our guides on Prosecco vs Champagne, Brut vs Extra Dry, white, red, and rosé wines?

FAQ

Here are some of the most frequently asked questions about Champagne.

What does Champagne mean?

The name Champagne comes from the French region Champagne where the wine is produced.

What is Champagne history?

The oldest trace of sparkling wine is from France. It dates back to the beginning of the 16th century produced with the so-called Ancestral method.

A century later this method was refined into the so-called Traditional method

Over time the champagne production increased significantly with exponential growth in the 19th century.

Where does Champagne grow best?

Champagne’s grapes grow best in cool climates, like the Champagne region in northern France.

The cool climate slows the grapes ripening, allowing them to maintain a high level of acidity which is perfect for sparkling wines.  

When is the perfect time to drink Champagne?

Traditionally Champagne is the perfect wine for celebrating an event. You should not limit to that though.

Champagne is extremely versatile, you can have it on its own or with an aperitif or throughout a meal.

I’m gonna say it, for me every day is a perfect day for Champagne!

Is Champagne sweet?

The Champagne sweetness level depends on the amount of sugar added during the dosage.

The most popular type is Brut with less than 12 grams of sugar per liter, aka g/l. Here are the sweetness levels:

  • Brut Nature less than 3 g/l.
  • Extra Brut less than 6 g/l.
  • Brut less than 12 g/l.
  • Extra Dry between 12 to 17 g/l.
  • Sec/Dry between 17 to 32 g/l. Despite the name, it’s noticeably sweet.
  • Demi-Sec/Medium Dry between 32 to 50 g/l.
  • Doux/Sweet 50+ g/l. This is the sweetest level.

You can find here the sweetness level for white, red, and rosé wine for comparison.

What are the Champagne Producers’ Types?

There are many Champagne producers on top of the Champagne houses.

That’s why on the Champagne label, you’ll find one of the following abbreviations to identify. the type of Champagne producer. They are as follows:

CM: Coopérative de manipulation, i.e. the cooperative member put their grapes together to make the wine.

MA: Marque auxiliaire, i.e. the brand that’s selling the wine is not related to the producer

NM: Négociant manipulant, i.e. these are companies that buy grapes and make the wine out of them. The majority of large brands fall in this category.

ND: Négociant distributeur, i.e. the wine is sold by a wine merchant using his own name.

RC: Récoltant coopérateur, i.e. the wine produced by the co-operative, is sold by a co-operative member under his own name and label.

RM: Récoltant manipulant, i.e. the wine is made by a grower using his own grapes, using a 5% maximum of purchased grapes.

SR: Société de récoltants, i.e. similar to CM but they are not a co-operative just an association.

When is the International Champagne day?

There is an informal Champagne day and it’s the 31st December of every year! Yes, that’s New Year’s Eve night!

Has Champagne sweetness level changed over time?

Yes it has. In the mid 18th century, Perrier-Jouët decided not to sweeten the wine before exporting it to the UK. Years later the designation Brut was created for the UK market.

In which bottle sizes come Champagne?

The most typical bottles used to ferment Champagne are the standard bottles, 750 ml, and the magnums, 1.5 liters.

Having said that you can find in other sizes up to the Melchizedek, 30 liters.

What’s Champagne's typical price range?

Champagne is a very expensive wine, right? Wrong 😋!

Ok, some are but the good news is that there is one for every pocket, especially if you are after the wine experience more than the name.

What I mean is that you can have a wine made in the same way as Champagne with an amazing price-quality ratio.

Cava or Franciacorta are great examples. Learn more about it here.

Generally speaking, this is what you should expect in terms of price:

  • Up to $30 Cava and Franciacorta.
  • Up to $60 Champagne brand names, mostly Non-Vintage. 
  • Up to $100 Vintages.
  • $100+ Premium/Luxury.

Why You Can Trust Us?

Wine is our passion and our mission is to make the world of wine more accessible to you and by doing so enhancing your experience.

We try our best to find high quality wines that offer great value for money so that they have a light weight on your wallet as well!🤩

Finally, all the content we publish on this site has been written or overseen by wine certificate holders, which ensures a high quality content.

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